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OHIO ART LEAGUE SPRING EXHIBIT 2020

JUROR: MICHAEL SEILER

I had the honor and privilege to juror the Ohio Art League’s Spring Exhibit. The Ohio Art League has a long tradition of excellent exhibits. I was really impressed with the wonderful array of styles, stories, techniques, and over diversity of the entries. I trust you will enjoy the show. Please share!

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JULY FRIST FRIDAY CLOSED

We’re so sorry, but we are not opening to the general public. We are renovating the studio and we are in the high risk category for the Covid virus.

Artwork is still for sale. We will see you by appointment only using masks and social distancing.

TROUBLED WATERS
$1,200.
A LONELY TIME
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New Works During Covid-19

WE WILL BE OPEN ONLY BY APPOINTMENT ONLY, WE WILL KEEP IN PLACE ALL THE SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS. CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT AND DETAILS.

In spite of our present situation with our pandemic, we have been quite busy. Here is a sampling of my N. Iowa and S. Minnesota landscapes. The flat but rolling hills speak volumes of time and space.

These are works in progress.

Asphalt and Alkyd landscapes

A NEW WATER FEATURE AND PATIO FOR OUR GARDENS

DAY LILIES AND WATER FEATURE

LEE CASEY HELPING SET THE BOARDER FOR OUR HEATED BRICK PATIO
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SPRING BEAUTY ARRIVES

HOPE

Even though we are in an unprecedented time, I find hope in my daily walks through our studio garden. Please enjoy!

Future Bonsais
Solomon Seal, Hostas, Astilbe, Lariop
Virginia Blue Bells
Our Dogwood about to bloom
Pulmonaria amongst the Irises
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MISSING YOU!

Empty Chairs

One of greatest joys of our lives has been our friends. First Friday Art walks have become a time where we can sit down and talk. Hearing everyone’s stories ties us together. Home becomes much larger than were we live. Home is “place”, where extended families inter act and broaden our vision and our world.

Our lives will be changed forever and going back to former lives is not necessarily a good thing. Some the greatest thinking and scientific and mathematic discoveries took place with the backdrop of the Black Plague in the 1660’s. My maternal grandfather born in the late 1880’s lived through two world wars, the Korean and Viet Nam wars, saw the invention of the car and air plane and the landing on the moon, and the Great Depression once said to me, “the good ol’ days were not so good.”

I don’t want to return to the past. Our future becomes our new lives. We will still make choices that will help form how we will live and who we will be.

This will pass, but we should come out of this a better people, I hope.

Most of all, we miss you all.

Mike & Kathy

See you soon
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SUBTLE CHANGES #1

As we are changing the manner in which we use our space at Seilers’ Studio & Gallery, I’m changing how approach my painting. It has been said that Walt Whitman spent his later years working and reworking his Leaves of Grass. I’ve often felt that I could improve some of my older paintings, even if it we’re just in small subtle manners. My concern is to raise a painting’s beauty a little so that it becomes a more complete work of art.

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ZANESVILLE IN THE SHORT NORTH

Oppositional Forces #7
Asphalt, Alkyd, and Oil
Michael R. Seiler

Zanesville artists showcased in the Short North

Shelly Schultz, Zanesville Times Recorder Published 1:53 p.m. ET Jan. 8, 2020 | Updated 4:08 p.m. ET Jan. 8, 2020

Former Chandlersville resident highlights local work in her gallery

ZANESVILLE – A group of Zanesville artists are being showcased this month in Columbus’ Short North district.

Chandlersville native Sarah Gormley has opened her High Street gallery to nine local artists, Jane Cardi, Alan Cottrill, Nora Daniel, Paul Emory, Jana Pryor, Linda Gall, Marti Steffy, John Taylor-Lehman and Mike Seiler. The exhibit opened on Jan. 3, and the Zanesville artists will be at the gallery for an artists’ reception from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday.

After graduating college, Gormley lived in Chicago, New York and San Francisco before moving back to the family farm to help care for her ailing mother.

“I needed to take a break from corporate marketing which has been my career to date, although I had always dreamed about opening an art gallery since my Grandma Cameron bought me my first piece of artwork when I graduated from undergrad in 1994,” Gormley said.

Tête-à-Tête” (face-to-face) bench by sculpture Alan Cottrill is on display during the Zanesville in the Short North exhibit in Columbus.

Tête-à-Tête” (face-to-face) bench by sculpture Alan Cottrill is on display during the Zanesville in the Short North exhibit in Columbus. (Photo: Submitted)

Gormley lived at the family farm for a year after her mother passed away in 2018. A year ago this month, she moved to the Short North.

When the owners of the apartment she rents learned that Gormley had an interest in opening a pop up gallery, they showed her a space on North High Street.

“I opened in April of last year knowing I had to pursue the gallery seriously,” Gormley said. “I’ve had a wonderful experience, largely due to the gracious support and help from people within the community, from Wood Company to the other galley owners and the local artists, all of whom have been absolutely generous with their time and energy.”

Gormley is on the board of the Zanesville Museum of Art and knows many of the local artists. She wanted to find a way to showcase the talent in a group exhibition so the exhibit, Zanesville in the Short North, was born.

“The show is a group of nine very different, but wildly talented individuals from Zanesville,” Gormley said. “The biggest challenge is that there is only so much wall space at the gallery that I could only take nine artists, it was difficult to choose.

Nine Ball by Zanesville artist Paul Emory is on display in the Sarah Gormley Gallery in the Short North District of Columbus.

Nine Ball by Zanesville artist Paul Emory is on display in the Sarah Gormley Gallery in the Short North District of Columbus. (Photo: Submitted)

“There are so many rewarding parts of this work, and it’s hard work,” Gormley said. “Meeting and getting to know the artists is phenomenal. There is nothing better than seeing a client react to a piece, to connect with the art and the story behind the piece of art, and seeing somebody decide they want to have it. To know what it means to each artist, it’s so powerful. And, to think about all of the joy the artwork will bring to that person or family for years to come – that’s the best part of owning a gallery, the human connection.”

cschultz3@gannett.com

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HOPE

On December 17th 2013 we lost an important building in our downtown artist district. Hope that day seemed to evaporate with the senseless and needless fire. But is hope really lost? In the last year 11 properties have changed hands on Main Street from 6th Street to 7th Street and S. 7th from Main St. to South Street are home owners. These people are artists, entrepreneurs, business men and women, thinkers, builders, doers. I see community and I see place. Work on all these properties continues. We will have our downtown back. We will see the “streets of the city restored”.

By the way, Pam’s plan for the empty lot on 6th Street is an other garden. My thanks to all of our friends and brave hearts who put their time, money, and souls into continue making the downtown our home! Thank you for the joy I feel as I take my walks around our streets.

Blessings to all.

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FRIST FRIDAY

Please join us at the studio for our Christmas open house.

Featuring Marge Overdorff on the piano, movie style popcorn,

hot mulled cider, and good cheer!!!

Beginning at 6:00 pm